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  • Protection and Safety

    Across the globe, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people live in fear for their physical safety. In countries that criminalize LGBTI sexuality, identity, or gender expression, governments may incarcerate LGBTI people in dangerous prisons. Several governments punish LGBTI people with torture and execution. LGBTI people are also vulnerable to abuse outside of government punishment. Many are forced to leave their homes. When they have to flee their countries, LGBTI people often find that there are few services available for refugees and asylum seekers, and those that exist may fail to serve LGBTI clients with respect and care.

ADDED ON: 01/05/2021

Report: Denial of freedom of LGBTQ+ artistic expression in Sudan

At least three LGBTQ+ organisations in Sudan are forced to operate underground, forcing artists to work with virtually no financial support, according to a report published on December 10 by Freemuse. In…

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ADDED ON: 12/30/2020

37 arrests of allegedly LGBTQ Senegalese since September

In Senegal, an almost totalitarian atmosphere reigns in the holy city of Touba. It is patrolled by Islamist religious militias. Citizens are encouraged to denounced suspected homosexuals. The latest arrest of a…

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ADDED ON: 12/30/2020

‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’: The Indonesian Military Case

In October, news broke about Indonesian Military (TNI) personnel who were dismissed for being a part of the LGBTQ community. As of this writing, TNI had fired and incarcerated 16 service members…

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ADDED ON: 12/29/2020

FROM THE FIELD: Misunderstood and mistreated; transgender women in Mexico

The Women of “Casa de las Muñecas Tiresias” shelter, have been providing up to 80 free meals a day to some of their most vulnerable neighbours. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people…

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Dr. Frank Mugisha – Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG)

Dr. Frank Mugisha directs Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG), an organization in Kampala that focuses on providing services and security to LGBTI Ugandans. Earlier this year, Dr Mugisha spearheaded a research project examining…

ADDED ON: 12/27/2020

38% of LGBT people in Japan sexually harassed or assaulted: survey

Nearly 40 percent of sexual minority people in Japan have been sexually harassed or assaulted, a private survey involving more than 10,000 respondents showed Saturday. The survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual and…

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ADDED ON: 12/27/2020

Tears of joy as LGBTQ asylum seeker battered by police wins fight to stay in Liverpool

An LGBTQ asylum seeker described their tears of joy when a judge said they could stay in Liverpool after fleeing murder, police brutality and discrimination in El Salvador. The artist, who now…

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ADDED ON: 12/25/2020

Uganda charges leading lawyer for LGBT rights with money laundering

Nicholas Opiyo, one of Uganda’s most prominent human rights lawyers, has been charged with money laundering. Opiyo, known for representing LGBTQ+ people, appeared before magistrates in Kampala on Thursday and was remanded…

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Tamara Adrián – Transgender National Assembly Member, Venezuela

Tamara Adrián is a lawyer, professor, and National Assembly Member from Caracas, Venezuela. She is one of the first openly-out transgender LGBTIQ+ elected officials in Venezuela. Ms. Adrián shares her perspectives on…

ADDED ON: 12/23/2020

The Godmothers: Five transgender women give back to society

Nammane, Summane, a temporary shelter and NGO for abandoned children rescued from the streets, will be inaugurated on Wednesday. It’s the first home of its kind in Karnataka because it has been…

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ADDED ON: 12/23/2020

From queer to queer’: How locals are supporting LGBTQ asylum seekers in Denmark

LGBT Asylum is an NGO whose aim is to offer support and counselling for LGBT+ asylum applicants in Denmark. It was formed in 2012, when the country allowed LGBT+ people to ask…

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ADDED ON: 12/22/2020

Greek LGBTQ+ rights: ‘It was a lynching. No other way to describe it’

Days after his death in the heart of Athens, the image of Zak Kostopoulos began to appear across the city centre, on buildings and nondescript office blocks, the marble steps of neoclassical…

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